As the MLB lockout is about to hit the two-month mark, fans have come to realize that things are starting to change. The player’s association has not yet come to an agreement on the terms of the next bargain agreement. If this all sounds like Gibberish, check out our previous articles on the MLB lockout.

The most significant update has been the small group of players who have begun singing overseas. Many of these are minor leaguers, but there are a few exceptions. One of these is all-star Yasiel Puig.

Puig, an all-star in 2014 and a home run derby participant, signed a deal overseas with the Heroes of the KBO league. Puig fell out of baseball after some questionable decisions that date back to 2017. Puig spent most of his time in the MLB with the Dodgers and Reds.

Arguably the most significant player on the move among Philadelphians is Phillies veteran shortstop Freddy Galvis. Galvis signed a deal with the Fukoka SoftBank Hawks in the Nippon professional league. He began his major league career in 2012 with the Phillies and ended it as the Phillies shortstop at the end of 2021. He played in some other organizations between 2018 and the beginning of 2021.

Some other minor league players/rookie relievers have also signed into private-professional baseball leagues.

The status of the new CBA agreement is relatively unknown has not progressed more than a few brief talks. The MLBPA met with the MLB today to continue the process of reaching an agreement. There has been progress, though, as they will meet Tuesday.

This has officially been the longest owner’s lockout in MLB history to date.

Ultimately, we do not know when to expect a deal finalized. Obviously, the sooner the better considering that players are expected to report to spring training in under a month. But, as always, there is a twist. Free agency is nowhere near over. Plus, arbitration is still a mess that is far from being cleaned up. Carlos Correa, Kris Bryant, Clayton Kershaw, Nick Castellanos, and many more are currently free agents. There will have to be some time in between the end of the lockout and the beginning of spring training (and the season depending on how long the lockout goes) for players to negotiate and sign with teams.

So, what does all this mean in simple terms?

Essentially, a deal must be finalized in the first week of February in order to hold a completely traditional spring training. This gives enough time for players to sign, warm up, play their exhibition games, and begin the regular season. Anything past this would jeopardize the spring training schedule.

So what would happen if spring training had to be adjusted? In 2020, the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic caused a shortened season; which also caused a three-week spring training. So, with time for players to sign and have a three-week spring training, a deal would have to be made no later than March 3rd. Anything past the third of March will most likely result in a delay to the regular season.